Thursday, June 26, 2008

Another book about the Tudors....


When I read that Alison Weir was writing a novel about Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Elizabeth I) I groaned along with most of the historical fiction groupies out there. It’s no secret that recently the market has been flooded with historical fiction focusing on Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth I, or one of Henry VIII’s wives. It’s getting tiresome.

So reluctantly I borrowed The Lady Elizabeth from the public library. I had enjoyed Ms. Weir’s first novel Innocent Traitor and thought I would try this one.

The Lady Elizabeth begins when Elizabeth is a young child. When we are introduced to Elizabeth her mother just died and it is up to her half sister Mary to tell the young child about the horrible tragedy. From there we are read about Elizabeth’s childhood and young adult life.

While I did enjoy this novel, I will say that it seemed like so many others that I have read about Elizabeth. However, Ms. Weir does play with some historical facts, which helps to make this book a more interesting read. One aspect about the book that I loved is that Elizabeth was curious about who her mother was. I always wondered how Elizabeth really felt about her Anne Boleyn. I mean, this is a woman who was brutally beheaded after she was convicted of treason and incest. Did Elizabeth believe that her mother was a horrible person as well? This book does a great job of exploring that topic.

Tudor fans will enjoy this book. People who are interested in Elizabeth will also want to pick this one up. Those looking for a book that focuses on Queen Elizabeth’s reign will not want to read this one because it only focuses on her childhood and young adult life. The Virgin's Lover by Philippa Gregory explores Elizabeth's early years on the throne.

3 comments:

Marg said...

I have this out from the library at the moment, and will be getting to it in the next few weeks. Does she does the numerous POVs in this one like she did in Innocent Traitor?

Ms. I said...

This book does not have the different POVs because its written in third person narrative.

I'd love to hear waht you think of the book.

Marg said...

I'm sure that I will put a review up at Historical Fiction....eventually!